Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 14th International Conference on Clinical & Experimental Cardiology Orlando, Florida, USA.

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Day 1 :

OMICS International Cardiology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yoshiaki Omura photo
Biography:

Yoshiaki Omura received Oncological Residency training at Cancer Institute of Columbia University & Doctor of Science Degree through research on Pharmaco-Electro-Physiology of Single Cardiac Cells in-vivo and in-vitro from Columbia University. He researched EMF Resonance phenomenon at Graduate Experimental Physics Dept., Columbia University. He published over 270 original research articles, many chapters, & 9 books. He is currently Adjunct Prof. of Family & Community Medicine, NY Medical College; Director of Medical Research, Heart Disease Research Foundation of NY; President & Prof. of Int’l College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics, NY; Editor in Chief, Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research, Int’l Journal of Integrative Medicine, (indexed by 17 major int’l Indexing Periodicals); Editor of Integrative Oncology. Formerly, he was also Adjunct Prof. or Visiting Prof. in Universities in USA, France, Italy, Japan, Korea, China, etc.

Abstract:

Various cancers existing at various parts of the body were detected from rapidly changing QRS complex as well as slowly rising part of T-wave of every ECG by detecting maximum electromagnetic field (EMF) resonance phenomenon between 2 identical molecules with the same amount (the simple method of which received a US patent in 1993). Strong EMF resonance phenomenon between specific cancer’s microscope tissue were detected not only from rapidly changing part of QRS complex, but at specific part of slowly rising part of T-wave which corresponds to the “Vulnerable Period For Ventricular Fibrillation” where dV/dt is insignificantly small. We were also able to detect cancer of various organs including esophagus, stomach, pancreas, colon, lung, breast, uterus, ovary, prostate gland and common bone marrow related malignancies such as Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, multiple Myeloma as well as four major categories of Leukemia. We were also able to find coexisting multiple cancers. From both QRS complex and rising part of T-wave, most of the drugs patients are taking 10 hours before taking ECG can also be detected. At Borrelia Burgdorferi (B.B.) Spirochete infected part of ECGs, we found significant decrease of Taurine and marked increase of ANP and Cardiac Troponin I and they are often associated with Atrial Fibrillation (A.F.). At every cancer tissue, hippocampus of patient with memory problems, & atrial fibrillation with significant B.B. infection, which is often unrecognized, Taurine was markedly reduced. Our research indicated B.B. infection is one of the major unrecognized causes of A.F. Optimal dose of Taurine of about 175mg made significant improvement to all these problems by improving circulation and increasing urinary excretion of bacteria, virus, fungus, and toxic substances. This new concept and method can be applied to any recorded ECGs for detection and screening of various cancers and infection including Lyme disease. Thus ECG can provide not only information on the heart, but also information on any single or multiple cancers, which exists at any part of the body.

OMICS International Cardiology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Charles H Hennekens photo
Biography:

Hennekens is the first Sir Richard Doll Professor and Senior Academic Advisor to the Dean. He was first John Snow and first Eugene Braunwald Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and first Chief of Preventive Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. His 173 H-index ranks him #14 Top Scientist in World. He was 3rd most widely cited medical researcher in world and 5 of top 20 were former trainees. He is #81 in world history for saving 1.1 million lives. He is a Fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine (FACPM) and the American College of Cardiology (FACC).

Abstract:

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is and will remain the leading avoidable cause of premature deaths in the US and is rapidly becoming so worldwide. The totality of available evidence on statins in the treatment and prevention of CVD is robust and includes over 200,000 randomized subjects from dozens of large scale trials designed a priori to test the hypothesis and their meta-analyses.  In secondary and high-risk primary prevention, clinicians should more widely prescribe evidence based doses of statins as first line drugs.  In low-risk primary prevention subjects previously considered ineligible, statins also have a favorable benefit to risk ratio.  Statins should be adjuncts, not alternatives to therapeutic lifestyle changes  of proven benefit including weight loss, physical activity, avoidance or cessation of cigarettes and diet.  In addition, any decision to prescribe statins should be based on individual clinical judgments that include all the risk factors of an individual and not simply those in any risk algorithm. Further, for individuals optimally treated with a statin and the responsible clinician wishes to prescribe additional therapy, the data are far less persuasive die nicotinic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, fibrates and ezetimibe. Finally, new and novel therapies, even if eventually proven to have a favorable benefit to risk ratio, will generally be adjuncts not alternatives to statins. The utilization of guidelines as guidance for clinicians should lead to more widespread and judicious prescription of evidence based doses of statins which, in turn, will lead to even greater net clinical and public health benefits in the treatment and prevention of CVD.

  • Clinical Cardiology, Heart Failure & Heart Diseases
Location: Hall A

Session Introduction

Tamara Feygin

University of Pennsylvania, USA

Title: Prenatal MR imaging of congenital heart diseases and associated abnormalities

Time : 11:15-11:35

Speaker
Biography:

Tamara Feygin is an Associate Professor of Clinical Radiology at University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Her primary interests are fetal and neonatal imaging. She led the development and implementation of magnetic resonance “Fluoroscopy” in clinical practice for assessment of dynamic processes in fetuses. She is a dedicated Educator and Mentor of medical students, radiology residents and radiology and neuroradiology fellows. She has been invited to present her work nationally and internationally. She is a Member of the European Society of Neuroradiology, the Radiological Society of North America, the Society for Pediatric Radiology, and a Senior Member of the American Society of Neuroradiology.Tamara Feygin is an Associate Professor of Clinical Radiology at University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Her primary interests are fetal and neonatal imaging. She led the development and implementation of magnetic resonance “Fluoroscopy” in clinical practice for assessment of dynamic processes in fetuses. She is a dedicated Educator and Mentor of medical students, radiology residents and radiology and neuroradiology fellows. She has been invited to present her work nationally and internationally. She is a Member of the European Society of Neuroradiology, the Radiological Society of North America, the Society for Pediatric Radiology, and a Senior Member of the American Society of Neuroradiology.

Abstract:

A variety of congenital heart diseases (CHD) may be diagnosed prenatally. Traditionally, the fetal heart was primarily assessed by fetal echography. However, fetal MRI has been proven as a helpful imaging tool in detection of cardio-vascular anomalies in utero. Numerous conditions, including transposition of great vessels, aorta coarctation, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, tetralogy of Fallout, cardiac aneurysm, pericardiac/cardiac tumors may be demonstrated on MR imaging. In addition, presence of other coexisting anomalies outside of the cardio-vascular system may be revealed. Some cardio-vascular anomalies may be more than an isolated problem and could be a part of an underlying systemic/genetic condition. Even in the absence of genetic abnormalities, infants with CHD are at increased risk of brain lesions (15-45%) or neurodevelopmental delay.  There is numerous data from autopsy reports, postnatal imaging and from more recent prenatal imaging research that congenital heart defects delay structural brain development in utero.  The demonstration of a full spectrum of fetal anomalies provides extremely valuable information to clinicians and parents-to be. Fetal MR may be a feasible addition for timely and precise diagnosis of cardiac disease and associated anomalies. Prenatal imaging therefore helps to predict pregnancy outcome, and prepares couples for the birth of a child with an abnormality.  The obtained information may also assist in thorough screening of fetal patients for eligibility for fetal treatment. It may help to prognosticate to some degree important issues of patient’s developmental outcome and quality of life.

Speaker
Biography:

Hideko Kasahara completed her MD and PhD from Nagoya University and National Institute of Physiological Sciences in Japan, and postdoctoral studies from University of Michigan and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard University. She is currently Associate Professor, University of Florida College of Medicine. She has published 48 papers, half of which are related to Nkx2-5 in reputed journals, and has been serving as an editorial board member of Laboratory Investigation.

Abstract:

Introduction: Heterozygous missense mutations in the homeodomain of human NKX2-5 lead to a high penetrance of diverse cardiac anomalies, including Tetralogy of Fallot, along with near complete penetrance of atrioventricular (AV) conduction defects, compared with mutations outside the homeodomain. We recently replicated a disease-causing missense mutation in the homeodomain in a knockin mouse model, Nkx2-5+/R52G, which demonstrate a high incidence of cardiac malformations and AV conduction defects. Although these mutant mice were backcrossed over 8 generations and expected to have almost the same genetic codes, these mice demonstrate pleiotropic cardiac anomalies, suggesting the presence of non-genetic effects.

Hypothesis: Since maternal health conditions are critical for normal embryonic development, we hypothesize that cardiac defects in the mutant mothers affects embryonic cardiac development.

Methods: Heterozygous mutant and wild-type mice were mated in two different groups: (Group 1) female mutant Nkx2-5+/R52G and male normal mice; (Group 2) female normal mice and male mutant Nkx2-5+/R52G mice. The offspring were analyzed postnatal day 7 (P7) by which the mutant mice with severe cardiac anomalies are expected to die.

Results: The genotype of the offspring from Group 2 follows the Mendelian’s law (51% wild-type and 49% mutant, n=115). However the ratio of the genotype from Group 2 was 65% wild-type and 35% mutant (n=89), suggesting that half of the mutant mice died before postnatal day 7.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that when the mothers have heterozygous Nkx2-5 mutation, less number of mutant mice survive until P7, and lead to near 50% of loss of mutant offspring by P7. 

 

Anil Om

McLeod Regional Medical Center, USA

Title: Percutaneous Coronary Interventions in patients with renal insufficiency

Time : 11:55-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Anil Om is an interventional cardiologist at McLeod Regional Medical Center in Florence, SC and Director of their cardiac cath lab.  He received his cardiology training from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, VA and his interventional fellowship from Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, NY. He has published more than 25 articles in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is one of the complications of contrast angiography.  Various measures have been tried to reduce CIN, but so far, pre-procedural good hydration and minimal contrast used in the procedure have been shown to be of real benefit.  This study reports performing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with minimal contrast.

Twelve patients with base-line significant renal insufficiency, felt to be at higher risk of CIN, underwent thirteen separate PCI by a single-operator.  Their charts were retrospectively reviewed for amount of contrast used and follow-up creatinine. All patients had iso-ismolar contrast and underwent evaluation by intravascular ultrasound.

No patients had CIN (defined by increase in 20% of serum creatinine from base line) and there were no procedural complications.

PCI in patients with baseline significant renal abnormality can be safely undertaken with proper precautionary steps (beyond the scope of this abstract) during the procedure. 

 

Speaker
Biography:

S Jamal Mustafa is the Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology at West Virginia University (WVU). He has received Dean’s Award for Excellence in Research from SOM in 2008 and became a Robert C. Byrd Professor in 2010 and received Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Achievement in Research and Scholarly Activities from HSC, in 2013. He has published over 200 manuscripts. His past work has led to the approval of an A2A selective AR agonist (Lexican®) for myocardial perfusion imaging. Currently, they are using AR and β adrenergic receptor KOs to better understand the relationship between these receptors in coronary flow regulation.

Abstract:

Adenosine increases coronary flow (CF) through the activation of A2A and A2B adenosine receptors (ARs). However, these mechanisms are not fully understood. We previously showed that adenosine-induced increase in CF is in part through NADPH oxidase (Nox), which is independent of A1 or A3 ARs. In this study, we hypothesize that adenosine-mediated increase in CF is through Nox activation and depends on A2A but not on A2B ARs. Functional studies were conducted using Langendorff mouse hearts. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production was measured in isolated coronary arteries from WT, A2A and A2B AR KO mice using immunofluorescence. Adenosine-induced concentration-dependent increase in CF was attenuated by the specific Nox2 inhibitor gp91 ds-tat or reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger EUK134 in both WT and A2B but not A2A AR KO hearts. Similarly, the A2A AR selective agonist CGS-21680-induced increase in CF was significantly blunted by Nox2 inhibition in both WT and A2B AR KO, while the A2B AR selective agonist BAY 60-6583-induced increase in CF was not affected by Nox2 inhibition in WT. In intact isolated coronary arteries, adenosine-induced (10 μM) increase in H2O2 formation in both WT and A2B AR KO mice was attenuated by Nox2 inhibition, whereas adenosine failed to increase H2O2 production in A2A AR KO mice. In conclusion, adenosine-induced increase in CF is partially mediated by Nox2-derived H2O2, which critically depends upon the presence of A2A AR. These studies may lead to better understanding of the role of ARs in coronary disease and may lead to better therapeutic approaches.

  • Workshop
Location: Hall A

Session Introduction

Gary Sweeney

York University, Canada

Title: Adipokines in the pathogenesis of heart failure: Good, Bad & Ugly

Time : 13:35-14:35

Speaker
Biography:

Sweeney obtained his BSc and PhD in Pharmacology at University of Glasgow, UK. He then moved to the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto as postdoctoral fellow. Sweeney is now Professor in the Department of Biology at York University. He has also served as Chief Scientific Officer and Diabetes Group Leader at Institut Pasteur Korea, a world-leading translational research institute. His research is funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canadian Diabetes Association and Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada. Studies have resulted in publications in leading journals including Diabetes, Nature Reviews Cardiology, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Endocrinology and Cell Metabolism. These studies focus mainly on diabetes and cardiovascular disease, in particular the mechanisms linking obesity with diabetes and heart failure.

Abstract:

The mechanisms of obesity- and diabetes-induced heart disease are multifaceted and remain to be clearly defined. There is currently great research and clinical interest in the effects of adipokines on the myocardium. This lecture will discuss the potential significance of adipokines in the pathogenesis of heart failure via their ability to regulate cardiac remodeling events including metabolism, hypertrophy, fibrosis, and cell death. As an example of a 'good' adipokine, the focus will first be on adiponectin which is known to confer numerous cardioprotective effects. Subsequently, lipocalin-2 is an example of an adipokine which mediates pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic effects. It is important when studying actions of adipokines to integrate cellular and mechanistic analyses and translate these to physiologically relevant in vivo models and clinical studies. However, assimilating studies on numerous cardiac remodeling events which ultimately dictate cardiac dysfunction into a unifying conclusion is challenging. Nevertheless, there is undoubted potential for the use of adipokines as robust biomarkers and appropriate therapeutic targets in heart failure.

  • Obesity and Heart, Cardiac Drugs & Cardiac Imaging and technology
Location: Hall A
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Objective: Evaluate the real-time tension adjusting to right ventricular pacing lead guided by transthoretic echocardiography during implantation procedure to the influence of long-term tricuspid insufficiency (TI).

Methods: Consecutive patients with following criteria were screened into the study:

1) Chronic three degree atriventricular conduction block. 2) Dual chamber pacemaker was intended to implant. 3) Without tricuspid insufficiency before procedure. 4) Right Passive fixarion ventricular lead from Medtronic Company could be used. Enrolled patients were randomized into TAF group (tension adjusting by fluorospy) and TAE group (tension adjusting by fluorospy plus echocardiography). All passive leads were fixed at right ventricular apex. After satisfied parameter measurement, Trans tricuspid lead tension was adjusted by fluorospy only in TAF group and by fluorospy plus echocardiography. In TAE group, lead tension was adjusten by fluorosoy at first. Then echocardiography was conducted to exam possible tricuspid insufficiency or valvular deformation until adjusting satisfaction. All patients were following up more than 12 months by regular echocardiography.

Results: Total 76 patients (63.8+-11.5 yrs, male 43) were enrolled. Thirty seven cases were randomized into TAF group (64.3+-9.6 yrs, male 21) and 39 cases into TAE group (62.9+-10.7 yrs, male 22). All procedures were successful without complications. In TAE group, mild to moderate TI were detected and rectified after primary floroscopy tension adjusting in 12 patients (30.8%). In TAF group, mild to moderate TI was detected within 24 hours after procedure in 9 patients (24.3%) and it was kept to the end of follow up. During the follow up of 17.5+-4.8 months, TI in TAE group was significantly less than that in TAF group (0.5% vs 24.3%, P<0.01).

Conclusions Echocardiography guided right ventricular pacing lead tension adjusting significantly decreases acute and long-term mild to moderate tricuspid insufficiency.

Speaker
Biography:

Jin Hur is an associate professor of Radiology at Yonsei University College of Medicine. He has completed his PhD in 2010 in Yonsei University College of Medicine.  He is now a visiting faculty in the department of radiology of Stanford University School of Medicine. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

It is clinically important to differentiate cardiac tumors from cardiac thrombi because of the difference in therapeutic approaches for these two pathologies. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of a volume based quantification using dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CCT) for differentiating between cardiac tumors and thrombi and to compare quantitative CCT values with late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) parameters. We prospectively enrolled 31 patients who had a cardiac mass on echocardiography or computed tomography (CT). All patients underwent dual-energy CCT (GE HD750) and 20 patients underwent LGE-CMR imaging. For quantitative analysis, the following parameters of the cardiac masses were measured: CT attenuation values in Hounsfield units (HU), iodine concentration (IC, mg/ml), and signal intensity (SI) ratio. A mixed effects model was used to evaluate the significance of differences in mean CT attenuation values, mean iodine concentration, and SI ratios between the cardiac tumor and thrombus groups. Diagnostic performance of each parameter was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. There were a total of 17 cardiac tumors and 15 cardiac thrombi. The mean iodine concentration (mg/ml) was significantly higher in cardiac tumors than cardiac thrombi (3.405 ± 2.624 for cardiac tumors; 2.056 ± 2.793 for cardiac thrombi, p = 0.001). The diagnostic performance of the IC and SI ratio for differentiating cardiac tumors from thrombi was not significantly different (AUC; 0.822 vs. 0.945, p = 0.084). Dual-energy CCT using volume-based iodine measurements can be used to differentiate between cardiac tumors and thrombi.

Speaker
Biography:

Mark Houston received his MD from Vanderbilt Medical School and Internal Medicine Training at UCSF.  He is an Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Clinical Instructor in the Department of Physical Therapy and Health Care Sciences  at  George Washington University (GWU), Director of the Hypertension Institute and Vascular Biology and Medical Director of the Division of Human Nutrition at Saint Thomas Hospital in Nashville, TN .

Dr Houston was selected as one of the Top Physicians in Hypertension in the US in 2008-2014 by the Consumer Research Council, and by USA Today as one of the Most Influential Doctors in the US in both Hypertension and Hyperlipidemia twice in 2009- 2010.  He was selected as The Patient’s Choice Award in 2010 -2012 by Consumer Reports USA.

He is triple boarded certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), the American Society of Hypertension (ASH) (FASH) and the American Board of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine (ABAARM, FAARM).  He holds two Masters of Science degrees in HUMAN NUTRITION from the University of Bridgeport, CT and another in METABOLIC and NUTRITIONAL MEDICINE (University of South Florida School of Medicine-Tampa).  

 

 

Abstract:

This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and single-center trial of 40 patients, consisting of a screening visit, a 2-week run-in, and a 4-month treatment period with a combination nutritional supplement (LC). Advanced lipid testing and advanced cardiovascular inflammatory markers were measured.  LC® significantly reduced total cholesterol, LDL-C, VLDL-C, ox LDL, ApoB, TG, LDL-P, heart rate and diastolic blood pressure and increased HDL-P and increased LDL size compared to placebo at one month and four months.   In addition, LC® significantly reduced hs-CRP, TNF alpha, IL-6 within the treatment group from baseline. There were no adverse effects in the treatment group. LC® did not lower Co enzyme Q 10 levels or adversely affect any other lab parameters that were measured. These changes would be expected to reduce cardiovascular risk.  LC® is an effective and safe alternative to statins and other lipid- lowering drugs in the treatment of dyslipidemia.

Khaled Sherif

Texas Tech University Health Science Center, USA

Title: Gastropericardial fistula, uncommon complication for common surgical procedure

Time : 15:35-15:55

Speaker
Biography:

Khaled Sherif has completed his medical school at the age of 25 years from University of Tripoli/ Libya and Internal Medicine Residency from Texas Tech University Health Science Center, Lubbock TX. He is then has completed 2 fellowship training in Geriatric Medicine and Palliative Medicine before he starts working as internist in Covenant Medical Center, Lubbock TX. He is also a clinical faculty at Texas Tech University Department of Internal Medicine. He has published many papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Gastropericardial fistula is an acquired disorder that is associated with a high mortality rate. It is a rare complication of laparoscopic surgery for reflux disease and thoracic procedures. A 74-year-old lady with history of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and surgically repaired hiatal hernia presented with history of chronic dyspnea and cough. Physical examination was normal apart of a pericardial rub. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis and the chest X-ray showed a large left-sided soft mass. As result of the mass on chest x ray, chest and abdominal CT scan was done and showed large pericardial effusion with hiatal hernia and gastro-pericardial connection. Gastropericardial fistula is an uncommon complication but it has very high mortality rate. Among causes that result in this condition, hiatal hernia and esophagogastric surgery have been the most frequently reported. The occurrence of post-operative gastropericardial fistula is induced by the perihiatal scarring. In addition, recurrence of hiatal hernia or migration of the surgical wrap may also favor occurrence of fistulae. For gastropericardial fistula, contrast media-enhanced traditional examinations are the cornerstone of diagnosis. Abdominal CT may reveal the fistula. Surgical correction is the most effective form of treatment.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Extensive clinical observations over the past decade have inextricably linked diabetes (DM) to cardiovascular disease (CVD) to an extent that an estimated 70% of all diabetics die from CVD complications. Despite significant clinical advances in CVD treatment, morbidity and mortality due to DM-associated CVD remains an important clinical challenge. Evidence suggests that AT2R, encoded by Agtr2 gene, improves cardiac repair after myocardial infarction. AT2R is an angiotensin II receptor and a member of the anti-inflammatory branch of renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Clinically, loss of AT2R expression in men due to the intronic G1675A or A1818T polymorphism is associated with increased arterial stiffness, and impaired kidney function. We hypothesized that an AT2R agonist that can elevate cardiovascular AT2R expression and activation in conditions of DM will protect patients from DM-associated CVD progression. There are no such drugs currently in standard of care. We reported recently that NP-6A4, an AT2R agonist developed by Novopyxis Inc., could increase the survival and viability of nutrient-stressed mouse and human cardiovascular cells better than beta-blockers and AT1 receptor blocker losartan. This study was performed to determine whether the protective effects of NP-6A4 are translational to a cardiac-impaired animal model (male Zucker Obese, ZO-M rat) a translational model for human CVD and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We treated 11-week-old ZO-M rats exhibiting CVD with NP-6A4 (1.8mg/kg/day by subcutaneous delivery) for 2 weeks. This treatment improved several cardiac parameters including circumferential strain of endocardium (p≤0.05), myocardial performance index (MPI) (p≤0.005), and E/E’ ratio (p≤0.002). NP-6A4 also reduced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis in ZO-M rats, and increased capillary density and AT2R expression in the heart (p≤0.05). Therefore, we conclude that NP-6A4 is an effective drug that can increase cardiovascular protective AT2R expression and mitigate DM-associated CVD.